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Our international team of wine experts reveal their favourite regions, cellar doors, watering holes and other vinous exploits the world has to offer.

*Here in no particular order.

Portugal's World of Wine (WOW) Museum.

41. Stay Home

St Hugo.
Santi Fernandez and Raymond van Puyumbroeck of Voyager Estate.

There’s no better time to look to our local wine regions for world-class experiences away from the city. Some of the best times I’ve had have been right here in Australia. Consider WA’s Margaret River: it has the climate, the landscapes and the hospitality. There are few places in the world that you can drink such amazing wines with such stunning views, like Voyager Estate ( voyagerestate.com.au) and Cullen ( cullenwines.com.au). In SA, Penfolds Magill Estate Restaurant ( penfolds.com) and St Hugo’s Restaurant ( sthugo.com) both offer top-level dining. Mark Baulderstone
➽ TIP: Also visit the D’Arenberg Cube Restaurant ( darenberg.com.au) and look around the quirky venue.
Jim Chatto says to try the local food trucks in Burgundy.

42. Burgundy Challenge

In 2019, I spent harvest in Burgundy, France. One of my favourite experiences had to be what we called in our family ‘The Burgundy Food Truck Challenge.’ We discovered the small villages had food trucks on different evenings – pizza in Pernand on Wednesdays, burgers in Puligny on Fridays! So the challenge became to visit a local village with a food truck each night, source a single-vineyard bottle from that village and picnic in the very same vineyard. Enjoying a wine where it is grown is such a wonderful way to get to know the wine and the facets that make it so special.  Jim Chatto
➽ TIP: Buy the wine from the producer and if it’s okay to go in the vineyard; they might just join you.
Join one of the WOW Wine School workshops held daily.

43. Try Portugal

Earlier this year, the World of Wine (WOW) ( wow.pt) museum opened in Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal. Housed in centuries-old cellars, WOW overlooks Porto and the Douro River, and is a top destination for oenophiles. The museum complex offers six immersive experiences. Get lost in the story of Portuguese wine, engage with every step of cork production, or be entertained by the customs associated with drinking through the Bridge Collection, with more than 1,800 drinking vessels dating from 7,000BC. Plus, the WOW Wine School holds daily workshops in association with the Wine and Spirit Education Trust.  Judy Sarris
➽ TIP: Take a walk along the Vila Nova de Gaia to visit the big names in Port.
Alto Adige’s Bolzano has great options for accommodation.

44. Cool-climate Wines in Alto Adige

Done Tuscany? Discovered Piedmont? Head to the delightful small city of Bolzano and sample one of Italy’s most idiosyncratic wine regions: Alto Adige. The scenery in and around Bolzano is spectacular, the wines excellent and the skiing stunning during winter (the famous winter resort of Val Gardena is just a short drive). Bolzano is home to several gourmet-focused hotels. The Parkhotel Laurin ( laurin.it) is a delightful upmarket hotel with lovely gardens. More affordable, but part of the same group, is the Hotel Greif ( greif.it), with a rooftop garden. When it comes to wine, Alto Adige is Italy’s version of Tasmania with the cool climate producing bright wines high in acidity.  Winsor Dobbin
➽ TIP: Try to time your visit to coincide with one of Bolzano’s many festivals.

45. Cupitt's on the Coast

The Cupitt’s Estate website says it all: Book a Table; Buy Wine, Beer and Cheese; Stay ( cupitt.com.au). Your every whim is catered for at this remarkable winery in the much-underrated Shoalhaven Coast, in NSW. Cupitt’s Estate is a regional showpiece. The wines are top-notch, and the craft beers and on-site fromagerie add layers to the experience. Cupitt’s Kitchen offers an outdoor deck with views over the family vineyard.  Peter Bourne
➽ TIP: If Cupitt’s cottage is booked out, try Bannister’s at Mollymook and enjoy Rick Stein’s seafood.

46. A Taste of France in Broke Fordwich

Krinklewood Biodynamic Vineyard ( krinklewood.com) in the Hunter Valley’s Broke Fordwich in NSW is a spot with true wine country charm and tranquility. The French-inspired boutique winery will transport you straight to Provence, with beautiful long lawns lined by pine trees, a pebble-stone courtyard and a friendly resident peacock roaming around. The vineyard and farm is run on biodynamic principles, having been Certified Biodynamic Organic for over a decade. It’s the perfect spot for whiling away a sunny afternoon (and be sure to give the Francesca Rosé a try).  Ellis van der Wulp
➽ TIP: Go for a stroll around the grounds to meet the many animals that play their part in the vineyard.
You’ll forget you’re in the Hunter Valley at Krinklewood.
Try foraging across Australia’s many great forests.

47. Forage in Australia

There’s something truly satisfying about spending a day foraging, especially when you have unearthed a stash of exotic winter fungi, soon to be devoured with wines from neighbouring vineyards.  Sunday morning mushroom picking in the forests of Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula with Cameron Russell is an enlightening experience. Ramblers set off from Moorooduc Estate Winery in search of all sorts of fungi, learning which is palatable and which is poisonous along the way. On return to the winery, enjoy a glass or two of pinot with wild mushrooms cooked over the wood fire ( mushroomtours.com). On the Apple Isle head to Tasmanian Truffles ( tastruffles.com.au) in Deloraine to hunt, with the dogs, for rare black truffles. Then, follow your nose to Stillwater for one of their famed, seasonal truffle dinners accompanied by an outstanding selection of local wines ( stillwater.com.au).  The Truffle & Wine Co ( truffleandwine.com.au) located in Manjimup, WA, allows a select number of guests to participate in their Black Périgord truffle hunt experience during the winter months. They also run the Truffle Kitchen, serving up fragrant, earthy dishes with just the right wine pairings.  Judy Sarris
➽ TIP: Book your truffle hunt well in advance as numbers are limited, for good reason: they are popular.

48. East Coast Tasmania

Overtime Wines.
Boomer Creek Vineyard.

The East Coast of Tasmania is booming when it comes to wine tourism. Boomer Creek ( boomercreekvineyard.com.au) and Overtime Vineyard ( apsleygorgevineyard.com/overtime-vineyard-wines) are among the newest cellar doors. Boomer Creek is a family business with a new cellar door that overlooks the vines, Schouten Island, and the Freycinet Coast. Rieslings, chardonnays and rosés shine. Pinot noir specialist Overtime Vineyard is a family business, too, and is situated overlooking the water at Bicheno. There’s also Freycinet National Park and Wineglass Bay to visit, both known for their spectacular beaches.  Winsor Dobbin
➽ TIP: The Farm Shed sells more than 50 wines from more than 20 regional producers (thefarmshedtas.com.au).

49. Wake-Up Call in Bordeaux Châteaux

With Bordeaux Châteaux now embracing visitors and increasingly opening their doors to the public, it’s time to consider a visit to this historical wine region. The city of Bordeaux has been nicknamed “sleeping beauty” for a long time, and is now bustling with wine bars, shops and a wide array of restaurants, thanks mostly to long-term visionary Mayor Alain Juppé who stepped down recently. To enjoy Châteaux visits to their full potential, it is necessary to make appointments in advance and the best in the business to plan your tour is Elodie Jouannel and her team of qualified guides at Bordeaux with Elodie ( bordeauxwithelodie.com) Elodie will ensure you leave Bordeaux bursting with knowledge of the local culture, history and wines and wanting to go back to this port city for your next holiday.  Daniel Airoldi
➽ TIP: If you are craving a proper coffee while in Bordeaux, visit Kuro Espresso Bar.
The Yealands White Road offers stunning vineyard and coastal views.

50. Meander in Marlborough

Marlborough in New Zealand is known for its picturesque rolling vineyards and coastal blue hues. But there’s no better way to get amongst it than with a bike ride through the vineyards on the Yealands White Road ( yealands.co.nz). Now, don’t worry if you haven’t jumped on a bike in a while. It’s a gentle ride, with some small hills but honestly you won’t be bothered, as you’ll be too busy taking in the surrounding views. The route will take you through the Yealands Estate Seaview Vineyard, as well as along the scenic coastline overlooking the Cook Strait. But, if bike riding just isn’t your thing, you can also drive along the White Road. You’ll work up a thirst either way, so follow your ride with a tasting at Yealands to learn more about their inspiring approach to sustainability across their estate.  Amy Northcott
➽ TIP: Download the Yealands Estate app, which will give you a variety of routes and suggested tours for your ride.