I do love cabernet. All the same, my ‘go-to’ regions are relatively few, fewer even than for pinot noir.

I’ve written before that cabernet sauvignon is a choosy grape variety, preferring maritime – near coastal – climates. Think Bordeaux, Napa, Coonawarra and Margaret River. Shiraz, in contrast, thrives in hot regions all the way to the very cool, and increasingly on good sites in Tasmania.

Within Margaret River, differences are driven by soil type, aspect and a general trend to cooler temperatures towards the south. That trend continues, particularly as you move inland to Great Southern, where shiraz takes over as the preferred red vine, although cabernet sauvignon still performs well on the best sites. That southern trend was reinforced for me by Virginia Willcock of Vasse Felix, and Gourmet Traveller WINE magazine’s Winemaker of the Year in 2012, telling me that the company is increasing shiraz planting at the southern end of Margaret River to make “a more elegant syrah”.

Our panellists on this occasion were entirely regulars: writer and educator Peter Bourne; writer, presenter and retailer Mike Bennie; fine wine consultant Andrew Caillard MW; judge and writer Toni Paterson MW; James Stuart Knox, manager and sommelier at Fix Wine Bar; and me, winemaking consultant Nick Bulleid MW. In general, the wines performed very well, but, as with any tasting of cabernet sauvignon, assessing tannin ripeness and balance were critical. Paterson, herself an experienced winemaker, called cabernet sauvignon “an unforgiving variety. Any mis-step …” Caillard said he often found “elevated acidity”.

The tasting delivered such largesse, with no change to our usual pointing, that we were faced with too many wines. Rather than leave worthy selections out, your editor and I decided to prune the notes (and my introduction) somewhat and choose a relevant and, I believe, accurate quote for nine wines. Good cabernet needs air from decanting. It also needs food and time in bottle. Given China’s passion for cabernet sauvignon, it’s reasonable to suppose that there are more than a fair proportion of the wines unexpectedly available on the local market. Enjoy!

No surprise that some of the wines from Margaret River came out on top.

Margaret River

2017 Amelia Park Cabernet Sauvignon, A$65, appealed to Bennie, who thought it: “A fine, rich flavour spectrum red, yet feels quite transparent, bright, spicy, crisp. It’s blueberry fruit, peppery spice, mint and fennel in spades. Tense and long, finely wrought, with a filigree of fine tannin shaping things well. A svelte, elegant, pent-up expression that needs time.” The wine’s strong on savoury spices that combine well with its red fruits. There’s distinct acidity, too, that sits well in the structure. I agreed the wine needs time.

2018 Arlewood Estate Cabernet Sauvignon, A$40, gained top points from Bourne, who wrote, “A luxurious nose of deep black fruits – blackcurrant, dark plum and mulberry – backed by dried herbs. The palate is generous with abundant fruit flavours, any tendency to excess curbed by a swath of sinewy tannins.” I found an estery fragrance that added to the berry fruits. The palate starts quite subtle, before more prominent firm tannins and acidity resolve the finish. Bourne thought it “needs three to five years to show its best”.

2019 Blackstone Paddock Cabernet Sauvignon, A$18, shows concentrated, ripe dark berries and even a hint of dark chocolate on the nose. The palate’s well structured, with an attractive mix of sweet and savoury. Good balance and length complete the picture. Bennie found, “Dark berry/plummy fruit, some green herbs, smoke and new leather. Sweet fruit. Has this lovely feel of mouth-watering freshness to it. Elegant and refined on style, this is a sleek red of easy drinking and quiet complexity, yet a serious feeling wine.”

2017 Brookland Valley Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, A$70, is youthfully fragrant with red berries. I liked the supple balance it achieves with dense flavours and at the same time well-managed tannins. Knox wrote of the wine: “A subtle nose of mulberry and tobacco. A dark-fruited palate, still quite primary with layers of seaside and black earth. There’s a hint of bay leaf lingering.” It is sure to age beautifully.

2019 Cullen Diana Madeline Cabernet Sauvignon Merlot, A$140, also appealed to Knox, who thought it, “Dense and brooding with dark berries and graphite notes. Lots of concentration here. Dusty tannins driving it to a great length. Built for the long haul.” After several elegant vintages, this wine is showing more depth and structure. The dark fruit flavours even have a pleasing chocolate overtone. It has a great future.

Smaller producers are making some great wines.

2018 Deep Woods Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, A$75, has great depth of dark berry fruit, with hints of red capsicum consistent with the variety. There’s mouth-coating but balanced tannins completing a sumptuous yet structured wine. Paterson thought it: “Quintessential cabernet with focused blackcurrant fruit and outstanding mid-palate concentration, housed within an elegant frame. The tannins are fine, adding support without obtrusion, and the bright acidity is appropriate. I love its clarity and seamless nature, the composure and density making it particularly compelling. Great ageing potential!”

2017 Devil’s Lair 9th Chamber Cabernet Sauvignon, A$120, won top points from Caillard, who found, “Intense blackberry, mulberry and dark chocolate aromas with hazelnut, herb, sage notes. Saturated and generous with deep-set dark fruits. Lovely underlying vanilla mocha oak and integrated fresh acidity. Fine, supple, velvety tannins. Finishes long and minerally.” I, too, liked the concentrated dark berries and also noted distinct acidity, but I did find the tannins stronger. No matter, the wine has the constitution to develop and gain complexity for many years.

2016 Domaine Naturaliste Morus Cabernet Sauvignon, A$90, started a bit closed for me, with hints of dried fruits and a little development. There’s more generosity in the mouth, however, with very good depth dark fruits and mildly astringent, mouthcoating tannins. Paterson thought it, “A warming, concentrated, fleshy wine with generosity of character. The palate is plush and slippery with blood plum, cassis and intense blackberry flavours. The tannins are plentiful, though ripe, and in balance with the body of the wine.”

2017 Fermoy Estate Cabernet Sauvignon, A$45, was for Paterson, “A tailored wine with quality fruit accented by flecks of oak. Plush red fruits are enhanced by bay leaves and sage, and a touch of pimento adds freshness and energy. The palate is soft and agreeable with excellent intensity.” I liked the wine’s intense red and black fruits, and touch of green capsicum. The tannins are quite firm, yet the concentrated flavours carry them, maintaining balance. It will age well.

Many cab savs demonstrated great potential for ageing.

2016 Flowstone Queen of the Earth Cabernet Sauvignon, A$74, is showing plenty of fresh berry aromas for a five-year-old, with oak adding complexity. The palate’s supple, with good line and fine tannins to finish. Caillard found: “Lovely bottle-aged characters. Intense cassis, Negroni, roasted chestnut tobacco herb aromas with vanilla bean notes. Well concentrated and developed, with fresh, sweet dark cherry flavours. Underlying and integrated nutty vanilla/ pistachio oak notes. Delicious drinking wine.”

2018 Fraser Gallop Parterre Cabernet Sauvignon, A$50, gets help from the other four Bordeaux red grapes. Bourne wrote, “This graceful red is heading towards its maturity with a complex bouquet of red and black fruits and savoury, earthy notes. A hint of old cigar box. Style and finesse on palate, with gently persistent tannins and a long satisfying finish. Perfect with a roast leg of lamb.” I found raspberry fragrance with a hint of vanilla, while the palate has tremendous suppleness, line and length. It’s developing nicely and would be brilliant now, but I thought the wine still had plenty of time in it.

2017 Gralyn Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, A$120, appealed strongly to Bourne, who noted, “Raspberry pastille and maraschino cherry aromas with hints of iodine. The tight concentrated palate and decisive tannins bode well for a long cellar life. It will be worth the wait.” The wine is certainly waiting to unfurl. The tannins are firm, matched by plenty of dark berry flavours, but I thought the nose somewhat dominated by oak spices and cedar. Give it time.

2016 Howard Park Leston Cabernet Sauvignon, A$50, impressed Bennie. “Inky, dark and brooding red. Choc-berry, mocha, liquorice, cassis and mint notes. It’s quite thick but set to medium weight, with satiny tannins and depth but a sense of freshness keeps it elevated. Lots of spice, lots of savoury notes, lots of fruit left. Lovely stuff.” The flavours are highly complex, with age adding tobacco and cedar fragrance. Red and dark fruit flavours mingle with dried herbs in this classically structured cabernet.

2018 Juniper Estate Cornerstone Karridale Cabernet Sauvignon, A$70, split the panel. Bennie gave strong support. “Attractive perfume of red and black berries, alpine herb, sea spray, kombu. I like it. Texture is great, satiny, a little plush, all elements wrapped up nicely and set at medium weight. Ripeness, balance and a fine web of smudged, dusty tannins.” I found some reduction and thought the palate dry and short and Caillard was less complimentary. Bennie concluded, “A satisfying, younger expression with time to burn. Quality feel in an old-school style.”

2017 Leeuwin Estate Art Series Cabernet Sauvignon, A$79, was for me an outstanding wine, with excellent red and black fruit concentration, subtle oak spices and a beautiful flow through the mouth. A hint of bay leaf proclaims its regional origin. Caillard noted, “Attractive, developed roasted coffee dark fruit aromas with marzipan notes. Generous and supple with inky fruits, panforte flavours, plentiful, persistent chalky tannins and integrated vanilla oak. Tightens up at the finish with a plume of tannins, a kick of aniseed, fresh long acidity and bittersweet chinotto notes.”

2019 Lenton Brae Wilyabrup Cabernet Sauvignon, A$80, has intense blackberry aromas with well-integrated oak, a delightful mix of sweet and savoury. The tannins are mouth-coating but fine – a good match for the flavours. Paterson thought them unbalanced, but Caillard had no issues, writing, “Intense mulberry, dark chocolate aromas with violet notes. Generous and vigorous with dark berry, elderberry, persistent fine grainy, grippy leafy textures, underlying espresso notes. Finishes firm but long and fresh. Distinctly cabernet with plenty of volume, density, and torque.”

2016 Mandoon Estate Reserve Research Station Cabernet Sauvignon, A$84, has concentrated dried cranberry and bay leaf in its nicely developing bouquet. Similar flavours sit in a soft, well-structured palate with beautifully even tannins. Knox found: “Bright raspberry and lavender aromatics. Juicy and quite slippery in its flow. A lively and bright wine with good focus.” Paterson wrote: “Vibrant, perfumed, with crushed leaf. Fresh and friendly!” This winery needs to be more well-known in the eastern states.

2019 Nocturne SR Cabernets Cabernet Sauvignon, A$30, had all-round support, with Paterson finding, “Dark fruit with excellent clarity and intensity. The palate is beautifully supple and stylish, and the tannins fine and well-knitted into the fabric of the wine. I adore the pomegranate and cranberry flavours and the freshness on the finish. A fine example of a medium-bodied cabernet.” I liked its concentration and vigorous blackberry and blackcurrant flavours. I noted a firm, stalky edge to the tannins, but it’s young, so give it time.

Undoubtedly cool, the regions are mostly protected from frost.

2018 Oates Ends Cabernet Sauvignon, A$50, prompted a brief but enthusiastic note from Paterson. “A juicy, vibrant wine with great energy,” she said. “I like the snappy red fruit and the succulence. You could drink this now.” I agreed, liking its suppleness and fine tannins. The nose took a little time to open up to show both black and red berries, and more savoury flavours mingle on the palate.

2017 Pierro Vintage Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon Merlot, A$43, shows an attractive combination of red berries and herbal notes. The palate’s balanced and supple, with just a mild bite to the tannins. Bennie found: “Redcurrants, raspberry scents, touches of vanilla and nougat. Sweetish tasting with tart acidity underlying. A sloshy, textured number – a creamy, flowing, soft, supple red. Medium weight, yet carries everything with some good depth. Pleasing drinking with maturity creeping in.”

2018 Sandalford Prendiville Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, A$120, had widespread support. It was a bit closed up-front, but there’s plentiful concentrated dark berry fruit and highly spiced oak. Caillard noted: “Fresh dark cherry, blackcurrant panforte aromas with roasted chestnut vanilla notes. Medium- to full-bodied with plentiful dark cherry flavours, black olive tapenade notes. Persistent grainy, grippy, leaning towards sinewy tannins. Finishes chocolaty, firm and long. Has the density to support the tannins and prolonged acidity.” Paterson thought it “a bold wine”. It needs time.

2017 Stella Bella Luminosa Cabernet Sauvignon, A$90, still shows some purple tinges in spite of its development. There’s good depth of blackcurrant and capsicum aromas, and similarly intense flavours. I thought the finish was a bit stern and needing a little time or air to unwind. Bennie recorded: “Cassis and sea breeze scents, whiffs of oyster sauce and dried, green herbs. Palate spreads pretty and broadly, fine tannins sweeping up fresh, red berry fruits and more of that herbal mix. Fresh, saline finish, too. A delightful drink.”

2015 Sittella Berns Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, A$60 (current vintage is 2018), was highly impressive, showing depth of flavour in a finely balanced structure. Knox noted, “Blackberry and briar notes. Fruit intensity with structure and vibrancy and a freshness that’s unexpected at this age.” A violet fragrance sits above the raspberry and dark berries; the sweet fruit flavours mirror the nose well. Fine tannins, and good balance and line complete the picture.

Pronounced black fruits were a feature of the cabernets the panel sampled.

2017 Suckfizzle Cabernet Sauvignon, A$65, also showed a violet perfume, adding more aromatics to intense, youthful blackcurrants. Paterson must have read my thoughts, as she wrote, “A well-balanced, well-made wine, bright and soft, with strong blackcurrant aromas and flavours. The palate is supple and flavoursome with hints of blackcurrant pastilles and violet. The tannins are fine and polished. Excellent depth, energy and length.” The wine is remarkably unevolved, showing freshness, density and intensity.

2018 Swings & Roundabouts Backyard Stories Cabernet Sauvignon, A$55, received a good reception. Caillard told us, “Intense mulberry, blackcurrant, black olive and lead pencil aromas. Well-concentrated inky textured wine with deep-set fruits, plentiful dense graphite textures, cedar and roasted chestnut oak. Attractive mid-palate viscosity and long fresh acidity. Elemental but integrated and ready for the long haul.” I agreed. The wine’s still closed and dense with dark plum and berry flavours, and lots of firm tannins. There’s a bit of typical cabernet sauvignon hollowness, but that’s a minor issue.

2018 Tripe.Iscariot Stygian Bloom Cabernet Sauvignon, A$52, carries a good combination of sweet and savoury – dark fruits with nutmeg and other spices from oak. Knox found: “Blue fruits. Good intensity with a well-polished tannin profile. A classic style, and it works. Great length and drive.” I liked the flow through the mouth, with flavours of berry fruits and spices mingling amidst fine tannins. A nicely crafted, poised wine.

2017 Vasse Felix Tom Cullity Cabernet Sauvignon, A$180, is still at an early stage, I thought, quite firm and dry, with the fruit bound up in the structure. Caillard saw it differently, describing it as “supple and vigorous with plentiful sweet fruit and viscosity”. His notes began, “Attractive blood plum, cassis, roasted chestnut, vanilla, leafy tobacco with cedar complexity. Inky textured with beautiful, pure blackcurrant flavours and dried roses note. Fine loose-knit and sinuous chalky tannins. Attractive mid-palate volume and persistent fresh acidity.” There’s certainly concentration and structure, so please give it time to unwind.

Climate change has delivered benefits for the Wairarapa.

2014 Voyager Estate MJW Cabernet Sauvignon, A$180, shows a beautiful raspberry fragrance with cedary complexity from oak and bottle age. The palate’s supple, plush in the middle, and finishes with fine tannins and good length. Bourne told us: “This graceful red is heading towards its maturity with a complex bouquet of red and black fruits interwoven with savoury, earthy notes. There’s even a hint of old cigar box. The palate is all about style and finesse with gently persistent tannins driving the finish. Perfect with a roast leg of lamb.”

2017 Woodlands Margaret Cabernet Merlot Malbec, A$70, shows concentrated dark berries on the nose and these are matched by plenty of typically firm, but balanced, cabernet tannins. Small portions of merlot and malbec assist that balance. Paterson found, “Dark, blueberry and blackcurrant fruit with medium body and a classical structure. Excellent mid-palate concentration. I enjoy the cleansing and restrained nature of the finish. A youthful wine with good integrity.”

2018 Xanadu Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, A$110, was one of my top wines. I liked its blackcurrant perfume and the real depth of ripe fruit that lies underneath. It’s medium- to full-bodied, with intense flavours and nicely dry varietal tannins, yet retains a stylish balance. Paterson thought it, “An elegant wine with lilting red fruit aromas and hints of fragrant violet. The palate is beautifully poised with excellent energy and definition. The tannins are fine, and the acid is appropriate and integrated. There is great flavour through the length of the palate. A classy wine with high appeal.”

2018 Xanadu Stevens Road Cabernet Sauvignon, A$80, grabbed Bourne’s attention. “Concentrated aromatics of ripe mulberries”, he began. “Damson plums and cedarwood with a whiff of dried seaweed. The palate is tightly held by a brace of pumice-like tannins. Everything is in its place – it just needs some time.” Knox thought a charry character stuck out. I found it quite closed on the nose at first. The flavours shine through, however, adding red fruits to the dark. It, too, has excellent length.

Cabernet can perform well in the Great Southern region of WA.

Great Southern

2019 Ferngrove Orchid Majestic Cabernet Sauvignon, A$40, appealed to Bourne, who noted: “Sweet, succulent plum and mulberry aromas. Fresh and up-front flavours with gently persistent tannins that mingle freely with a juicy, mouth-refreshing acidity. A nicely poised wine.” I found a “cool” note to the red fruit aromas, adding a fragrance of garden herbs. The palate’s medium bodied and elegantly structured, with nicely balanced tannins. It suggests an early drinker, but could surprise.

2018 Forest Hill Block 5 Cabernet Sauvignon, A$65, combines dark and red berries with well-integrated oak. The flavours suggest a real essence of cabernet, both in style and intensity, and also a sense of purity. Knox noted: “Dark fruits and dusty earth notes. Good concentration of fruit with length and drive. Tannins are supple and fine-grained with a view to the long term.”

2018 Frankland Estate Olmo’s Reward, A$85, pleased Caillard, who told us, “Fresh, intense warm mulberry, cassis, roasted coffee aromas. Well-concentrated blackcurrant, roasted chestnut flavours. Plentiful fine chalky, hint grippy, tannins and integrated acidity. Finishes long and sweet. Very attractive wine with superb density, balance and torque.” I liked the fragrant fruits and touch of garden herbs which add further perfume. The wine needs time.

2018 Harewood Estate Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, A$34, was one of Bennie’s top wines. “Dark berries and plummy fruit scents,” he started. “A touch of dark chocolate and ground nuts, the faintest whiff of clove and bay leaf. Nice start. Supple in the palate, quite a bit of richness, more of the ground nut, and spice is stronger and deeper here. A generous, fuller mouthful with concentration yet effortless glide.” Several of us found red fruits, too. I agreed on the wine’s poised style and loved its soft, fine tannin balance and line. It’s not a heavyweight by any means, but has intensity.

Four points separated the two Rockburn pinots.

2017 Houghton Jack Mann Cabernet Sauvignon, A$175, has rich red and black berries on the nose with distinct new oak. The flavours are similarly generous, even lush, and fine tannins provide roundness and balance. Knox noted, “Mulberry and tapenade. Palate shows weight and depth with a savoury iodine note and hints of cola spice oak. Good length and supple tannins.” The oak is prominent, but this line is made for the long haul and this vintage follows suit.

2017 Howard Park Scotsdale Cabernet Sauvignon, A$50, found a fan in Bourne. “Spicy red and black fruits – boysenberry, mulberry and plum”, he told us. “Fine, structured and elegant with gentle tannins and a clean acid-etched finish. A good example of a medium weight yet highly flavoursome cabernet. An old school claret?” I liked its lively raspberry aromas, still fresh at four years of age, and its supple balance. The wine does tighten towards the finish, that acidity adding to the tannins, but the good flow remains.

2016 Larry Cherubino Frankland River Cabernet Sauvignon, A$120, gained top points from Caillard, who found, “Dark chocolate, mulberry, roasted cashew nut, chinotto aromas. Generous and supple with fine smooth velvety tannins. Lovely integrated new oak notes and persistent mineral acidity. Builds al dente firm with plentiful sweet fruit. Very nice.” I liked the cedar and tobacco notes in its developing bouquet. The wine is coming around slowly, as the tannins have a distinct chew, but it has time in it yet.

2018 Robert Oatley Pennant Frankland River Cabernet Sauvignon, A$105, for me showed very ripe dark fruits with hints of jam. The palate follows – full-bodied and concentrated, with depth of flavour and slightly chewy tannins. Bourne saw different characters, writing, “Raspberry, white cherry and boysenberry aromas morph to a clean, bright palate. It’s all about juicy red fruits with a vibrant acidity and fine-grained tannins. Quite an elegant cabernet.” It will age well.

2014 West Cape Howe King Billy Cabernet Sauvignon, A$50, shows dense, dark fruit and hints of black olive. Generous palate, mouthfilling, with fine tannins to finish. Bennie thought it, “Old, leathery and yet curiously bright, with acid and latent fruit characters. In the brick dust, savoury spice, dried fruit spectrum, but the gloss of orangey acidity frisks things up and keeps things going. Savoury as, but in a good place for maturity of the wine.”

Mild or majestic, firm or flimsy, the tannins were key to a strong finish.

Wines in Brief

2016 Cape Mentelle Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$110: “Blackberry, dark chocolate, plentiful chalky/firm, graphite tannins. Lovely volume of richness.” – Caillard

2016 Evans & Tate Redbrook Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$65: “Blueberry, blackcurrant, cassis and black olive. Quite a lot of concentration, flighty, fine tannin.” – Bennie

2018 House of Cards The Royals Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$40: “Lush red fruits, cedarwood and spice. Bright and zesty with acid and tannin. Dangerously drinkable red.” – Bourne

2016 Juniper Estate Cornerstone Wilyabrup Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$90: “Cola, cedar and bay leaf. Concentrated forward fruit with a firm tannic profile.” – Knox

2018 Moss Wood Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$137: “Sweet red and dark berries. Savoury cedar notes. Undeveloped, oak tannin and acidity firming the finish.” – Bulleid

2018 Moss Wood Ribbon Vale Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$70: “Sweet, pretty and fleshy. Clove oak, black berry/plum, leafy notes, excellent texture. High drinkability.” – Bennie

2018 Plantagenet Wyjup Cabernet Sauvignon, Great Southern, A$80: “Perfume, ripe plum, iodine. A reserved wine, tense and taut, grippy with dusty tannin. Very decent.” – Bennie

2016 Willow Bridge Coat of Arms Cabernet Sauvignon, Geographe, A$30: “Dried cranberry, liquorice, complex development. Concentrated flavours. Highly structured.” – Bulleid

2016 Woodlands Clementine Eloise Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$189: “Perfumes of red plums, raspberry pastilles and cinnamon. Racy energy. Tightly woven tannins.” – Bourne

Newer wineries were a match for their established counterparts.

Top Western Australian Cabernets

★★★★★
96 2018 Xanadu Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$110
95 2017 Fermoy Estate Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$45
95 2018 Swings & Roundabouts Backyard Stories Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$50

★★★★
94 2018 Sandalford Prendiville Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$120
93 2018 Deep Woods Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$75
93 2018 Fraser Gallop Parterre Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$50
93 2015 Sittella Berns Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$60*
93 2018 Xanadu Stevens Road Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$80
92 2019 Cullen Diana Madeline Cabernet Sauvignon Merlot, Margaret River, A$140
92 2018 Forest Hill Block 5 Cabernet Sauvignon, Great Southern, A$65
92 2018 Frankland Estate Olmo’s Reward, Great Southern, A$85
92 2014 Voyager Estate MJW Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$180
91 2019 Blackstone Paddock Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$18
91 2017 Brookland Valley Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$70
91 2016 Domaine Naturaliste Morus Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$90
91 2018 Harewood Estate Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Great Southern, A$34
91 2016 Larry Cherubino Frankland River Cabernet Sauvignon, Great Southern, A$120
91 2017 Leeuwin Estate Art Series Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$79
91 2019 Lenton Brae Wilyabrup Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$80
91 2016 Mandoon Estate Reserve Research Station Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$84
91 2019 Nocturne SR Cabernets Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$30
91 2018 Oates Ends Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$50
91 2017 Pierro Vintage Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon Merlot, Margaret River, A$43
91 2018 Robert Oatley Pennant Frankland River Cabernet Sauvignon, Great Southern, A$105
91 2017 Stella Bella Luminosa Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$90
91 2018 Tripe.Iscariot Stygian Bloom Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$52
91 2017 Vasse Felix Tom Cullity Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$180
91 2017 Woodlands Margaret Cabernet Merlot Malbec, Margaret River, A$70
90 2017 Amelia Park Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$65
90 2018 Arlewood Estate Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$40
90 2017 Devil’s Lair 9th Chamber Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$120
90 2019 Ferngrove Orchid Majestic Cabernet Sauvignon, Great Southern, A$39
90 2016 Flowstone Queen of the Earth Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$74
90 2017 Gralyn Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$120
90 2017 Houghton Jack Mann Cabernet Sauvignon, Great Southern, A$175
90 2016 Howard Park Leston Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$50
90 2017 Howard Park Scotsdale Cabernet Sauvignon, Great Southern, A$50
90 2018 Juniper Estate Cornerstone Karridale Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$70
90 2017 Suckfizzle Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$65
90 2014 West Cape Howe King Billy Cabernet Sauvignon, Great Southern, A$50

★★★
89 2016 Cape Mentelle Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$110
89 2016 Evans & Tate Redbrook Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$65
89 2018 House of Cards The Royals Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$40
89 2016 Juniper Estate Cornerstone Wilyabrup Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$90
89 2018 Moss Wood Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$137
89 2018 Moss Wood Ribbon Vale Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$70
89 2018 Plantagenet Wyjup Cabernet Sauvignon, Great Southern, A$80
89 2016 Willow Bridge Coat of Arms Cabernet Sauvignon, Geographe, A$30
89 2016 Woodlands Clementine Eloise Cabernet Sauvignon, Margaret River, A$189